Tag: seed saving

Gardening Journal – Seed Saving with Pa Kettle

Friday night we brought dinner to my father-in-law (whom I affectionately call Pa Kettle) and after dinner we took a stroll in his garden. This stroll is a nightly routine and better entertainment than most comedy clubs. The kale has gone to seed, so he showed me how he dries the seeds for planting in the fall. His process is quite simple.

Break a stem off from the kale plant and strip the seed pods from it. Be sure to swing your open pocket knife around and gesture wildly while telling stories. Ideally, no one should lose an eyeball while collecting seeds, but as he says “you just don’t never know about things”.

Place the pods in a paper bag (best for breathability) and close the bag. Hang the bag in a cool, dry place until the pods become brown and papery. If you don’t have a cool, dry place for seed saving, just hang them in the dark, damp garage. This method has worked for him for decades.

Gently break the pods open to release the seeds. The seeds should be dark in color. When opening the pods, compete to see who gets the most. Winner gets bragging rights until next season. Your seeds are ready for planting.

This method works for most any “salad” seeds. Pa Kettle also saves cress seeds using this approach.

Cress seed pods

Now, go walk around the garden and admire everything else that is growing.

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Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Drying Coriander Seeds

I mentioned in the mid-summer garden update that I turned my head for a minute and the cilantro bolted. Yep. That happened.

Did you know that the herb cilantro refers to the leaves of the plant, and coriander, the seed, is a spice? Cool, huh? She’s one hardworking plant.

I’m harvesting and drying the coriander seeds this week. Once the plant has started to turn brown, snip off the seed heads. Since I’ve never done this before, I’m not sure how brown is brown enough. Half of the plants are still green.

Allow the seed heads to dry fully. I’ve read that you can harvest the seed heads directly into a paper bag for drying, but I’m experimenting with drying them on the window screens that I used to dehydrate the basil. Which worked beautifully, by the way.

We run our dehumidifier in the basement constantly, so that area should work well for drying any plant. Once dry, the seeds will fall, and can be collected and stored in a sealed container.

I’m not sure if I can get one more crop of cilantro out of the herb bed before frost, but I’m going to try. Regardless, I’ll save this seed to plant in the spring.

For more reading on cilantro/coriander:
https://www.almanac.com/plant/coriander-and-cilantro

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.