Tag: milk glass

Milk Glass in the Kitchen

I’ve been collecting milk glass and using it throughout the house for years now. (Too many years to count!) Back when I began collecting, I could find pieces at the flea market and thrift stores for twenty five or fifty cents. While the days of that pricing are long since over, I still find pieces in the wild for a dollar and up. The milk glass I collect is most useful if it can serve multiple purposes. To that end, I like to use it in unexpected ways. Here are a few ideas for using milk glass around the kitchen:

Use a large vase to keep favorite cooking utensils handy next to the stove. See that wooden spatula in the back? I bought it at Tamarack in Beckley, West Virginia. It’s handmade, sturdy and obviously, very useful. Also, I had to buy it because it was labeled “cookie shovel”, and when life gives you an opportunity to own such a magical item, you take it.

Turn a wide-bottomed bowl over and place a large plate on top to create a DIY cake stand. If you’re concerned about stability, a few dabs of hot glue or sticky dots will hold the two pieces together. Gather soaps, brushes and dishcloths by the sink. My sister brought me that tiny bud vase from Mexico. I just love it!

Because our kitchen is tiny, and we need all the drawer space we can find, we keep our eating utensils in containers on the counter. We tried this using drinking glasses until we knew that this set-up would work long term.

A cake stand makes a useful and decorative display for citrus. I’ve seen onions and garlic presented this way as well, but I think lemons, limes and oranges are prettier. It’s that whole “I love color; not into neutrals” thing.

No milk glass? No problem! Use what you have. Fiestaware is great for this use. With a mix of Fiesta plates and bowls, you can have a cake stand in every color of the rainbow.

How about Grandma’s china? (Perhaps we shouldn’t use the hot glue gun on that?) Mix and match dishes and bowls for a boho look. I used a small, vintage Pyrex bowl in this aspect.

Mason jars make perfectly charming utensil holders.

Use your imagination to see your things in a whole new light. You’ll be amazed at what you can create! If you try try this quick project, I’d love to see your results. Let me know in comments, or email me at: arthurized dot home at gmail dot com.

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Deviled Eggs, Three Ways

Much like Peeps marshmallow candy, deviled eggs are polarizing. You either love them or you hate them. We’re in camp Love Them. Deviled eggs that is, not Peeps.

Because they’re are a pain in the butt to make, I usually make a large batch of deviled eggs, 8-10 whole eggs at a time. We eat them until we don’t want to see another one for six months or so.

This deviled egg plate belonged to my husband’s great aunt, Ruth.

To make hard boiled eggs:
Bring a large pot of water (mine holds 7 quarts) to a rolling boil. Gently, gently lower 8-10 eggs into the water. Don’t crowd them. Leaving the pot uncovered, lower the heat to a medium simmer. Simmer for 14 minutes and transfer the eggs to an ice bath for five minutes. Peel the eggs.

Once the eggs have cooled enough to handle, slice them in half lengthwise and release the cooked yolk into a mixing bowl.

Classic Deviled Eggs
For 8-10 eggs, mix 1/2 cup (or so) of mayonnaise, a little finely ground salt and white pepper into the cooked egg yolks. Add a teaspoon of honey, or other sweetener to taste. Mix until the filling has a smooth texture. Pipe or spoon into egg halves and lightly sprinkle with paprika and chopped flat leaf Italian parsley (optional).

Classic Deviled Eggs with Bacon
Because bacon makes everything better! Mix bacon crumbles into the classic filling, spoon into whites and sprinkle more crumbled bacon on top.

Guacamole Bacon Deviled Eggs:
Not the prettiest deviled egg, but dang, they’re tasty! Serve these babies immediately so that the avocado doesn’t oxidize. My version is loosely based on this one. Instead of making my own guacamole, I take some help from the store and use pre-made. I like the classic guacamole from Aldi.

For 8-10 eggs, I use 6 – 8 oz. of guac. I substitute Cholula hot sauce for the jalapenos, because I never remember to take my contacts out before chopping jalapenos and things get ugly from there. Mix bacon into the filling, sprinkle more on top.

Bring literal deviled eggs to your next Halloween party with little slivers of red bell pepper for horns. So cute! The horns would work well with any of these variations, with or without other garnishes.

Now, go throw that bacon around like confetti!

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.