Tag: crafternoon

Make a Pumpkin Pie Bunting

How fun is this little bunting?! I decided to write a tutorial so that you can make one (or a million) too!

For each 8 slice bunting, you will need the following materials:

Kunin ‘Pumpkin Spice’ felt sheets – 1 sheet per bunting, bought at Joann Fabrics
Kunin ‘Cashmere Tan’ felt sheets – 2 sheets per bunting, bought at Joann Fabrics
Clear Tacky Glue
Hot Glue – I use mini glue guns for small projects like this one.
Scissors – I use mine for fabric only. They stay sharp for years this way.
Twine – Raid the garage, any twine will do. Cut to 8′ length.
1″ White Pom Poms – You’ll need one for each slice of pie. I used store bought; but tiny, hand made poms would be darling.

To make the pie slice template: Cut a piece of chipboard or heavy cardstock into a 3″ x 4″ rectangle. Find and mark the center of one 3″ end.

Draw lines from the opposite corners to create the triangle, as shown.

Curve the crust end of the template just slightly; use a small saucer as a guide, if you like.

Using your fancy-schmancy template, cut eight slices each of cashmere tan and pumpkin spice. Glue each slice of pumpkin spice onto a slice of cashmere tan, using clear tacky glue. (The glue is important. I tried white tacky glue and it seeped through the felt and was visible when dried. #craftfail #tragic)

We’ll trim the sides of the slices later, so avoid gluing all the way to the edge. (Dried glue is difficult to cut through and shows between the layers of felt.) Dot the center of each slice with glue so the weight of the pom pom doesn’t pull it loose.

Don’t worry about lining the edges up perfectly. Set the slices aside to dry.

For the pie crust: Starting on the long side of the felt sheet in cashmere tan, cut strips in gentle waves slightly narrower than .5″ wide. Repeat until you have six strips total.

Lay the strips out, and then flip every other strip over so the waves are opposite one another as shown below.

Overlap the ends of each set of two strips. Using hot glue, dot the ends and press together in a narrow “v” shape.

Once the glue has set, start to lay the strips over each other without twisting them. As you work, dot the underside between the strips with hot glue. I glued every second overlap. Be sure to burn off your fingerprints with the hot glue. I don’t think you can call yourself a crafter if you don’t. (Of course, I’m kidding. Please take care when crafting dangerously.)

Continue overlapping and dotting the underside with glue until you reach the end of the strips, then glue the end closed. The strips should lay fairly flat. You’ll need three complete strips for the eight slice bunting.

Use the template to trim the sides of the now dried, pie slices.

Find the center of the length of twine and place it between two pie slices spaced 1.5″ from each other. Using hot glue, quickly glue the twine down. Spacing evenly, work outward from the center, adding three more slices on each side.

Next, glue sections of pie crust trim to the top of each pie slice. Leave a little excess overhanging the edges.

Turn the bunting over and cut off the excess crust. Take care not to cut the twine accidentally! If the cut ends of the trim are loose, dot hot glue on to secure.

Hot glue a white pom pom to the center of each slice for the dollop of cream, then hang your bunting! Mine is just wide enough to span the front of the Hoosier cabinet.

See that cute little tractor? I’m gossiping about it on Instagram today. Join me!

Whether you are travelling for the holiday or staying hygged up at home, I hope your Thanksgiving celebration is a happy one.

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019 Β© Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Let’s Have a Crafternoon – Painted Acorns

Here’s a quick and thrifty idea for fall decor. Paint acorns in every shade of the rainbow, (well, except for purple, apparently) and pearlize them. This is a simple and fun craft to make with kids.

Don’t you think these look like tiny candies?

Here’s how I made them:

Collect fallen acorns.

Rinse the acorns thoroughly, and allow them to dry completely.

(Bonus step: Bake the acorns in the oven at the lowest temperature for an hour or so, to kill any unwanted inhabitants. I didn’t do this, but I should have. I left mine in a bucket in the garage for two weeks or so. Apparently the little freeloaders can live for two weeks in there. Notice a worm. Scream like a girl, etc.)

Glue loose acorns back into their caps using clear tacky glue.

Carefully paint the acorn using acrylic craft paint and flat and detail paint brushes. Let the first coat dry, then apply a second coat if necessary to get the desired coverage. One the acrylic paint has dried, apply a pearlizing medium over the acorn. This will soften the tone of the first coat considerably. Let dry, and display as you please.

Crank some tunes, make a mess! Sip a big ol’ mug of tea while you’re working.

Here are some ideas for variations:

  • Go monochromatic, and paint the entire acorn in a single color.
  • Create an ombre display using progressively darker tones of the same color.
  • Mix pearlizing medium directly into the acrylic paint if you like.
  • Dry-brush the cap using white paint for a weathered effect.
  • Paint glue onto the cap and sprinkle glitter over the wet glue.

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019 Β© Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Make an Easy Beaded Bracelet

Each year at the beach, the whole crew goes souvenir shopping at Callahan’s of Calabash. It’s tradition. We load up on tees, hoodies, ball caps, beach totes and usually buy a blown glass Christmas ornament or two. We try to find an ornament that commemorates a special occasion, accomplishment or event during the year. For the past several years, my cousin Ruby and I have selected a piece of costume jewelry so that we can ‘twin’ across-the-miles when vacation is over.

This beaded bracelet with wooden buckle clasp was our pick a few years ago. Over time the elastic has become slack on a few of the strands, so it’s time for a restring. While I’m repairing mine, I thought it would be fun to show you how to make these easy bracelets. This project is simple enough that older kids can make them, with a little adult assistance in tying the knots.

Here are the materials you’ll need:
Buckle Clasp
Beads
Jelly Cord – I’m using 1mm
E-6000 – optional, to secure knots
Scissors
Ruler
Toothpick, or other small implement for applying glue – if using E-6000
Beading tray or kitchen towel – I don’t have a beading tray, so I use a terry cloth kitchen towel to stop beads from rolling off my work surface.

Now it’s time for math class! To calculate the length of beads needed: Using your favorite bracelet length, subtract the length of the buckle clasp when closed and multiply the result by the number of strands in the bracelet. (If you are using very chunky beads, make your bracelet a little longer than normal because of the larger bracelet circumference. The cord will sit farther away from your wrist. Does that make sense?!)

I like a 7.5″ bracelet. The buckle clasp is 1.5″ long when closed, so my strands of beads would be 6″ long. I have 5 holes in the clasp, and 6 x 5 = 30, so I need 30″ of beads. I bought a little extra in case there are any wonky beads. Make sure the bead strands will be narrow enough to fit into your clasp without crowding – I’m using 6mm beads, but I could have gone a little wider. Okay, class dismissed. Now it’s time for the fun stuff!

Taking your bead length measurement from above, cut a generous length of jelly cord. Keep in mind that you will need extra cord to feed through the clasp ends and for knot tying. I cut mine at about 40″.

Slip one end of the jelly cord through an end hole in one of the clasp pieces. Tie a large knot in the jelly cord, and pull it tight. Tug on it to make sure that the knot will not pull through the hole in the clasp. String the first row of beads, measure for length, then weave the jelly cord through the other clasp piece.

Repeat the process for each row. Before tying the final knot, lay the bracelet flat and make sure that the rows are uniform in length, and the cord is pulled firmly through, but not stretched. I used the toothpick end to tighten the jelly cord loops, row by row. Tie a large knot at the end. Trim the excess cord off of each end, and place a dab of E-6000 on each knot to help secure it. Your bracelet is complete!

To shop the post: Jelly cord / E-6000 / Buckle clasp / Beads

Love the beads, but not up for a crafternoon? I got you.
Multicolor / Turquoise / Lavender Multi / Red

Do these beads look like Sixlets to you, too? Don’t you think this is the adult version of wearing a candy necklace? This bracelet is a fun way to perk up weekend denim or a plain jersey and would make cute, girlfriend gifts. Happy Crafting!

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019 Β© Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.