Category: create

An Arthurized Gift Guide – Stocking Stuffers For Men

I know it’s cliche, but coming up with gift ideas for the men in my life is no easy task. Generally speaking, if they want something, they just order it. They’re problem solvers like that. If you get stuck trying to think of fun stocking stuffers for the men in your life, here are a few ideas:

Something to wear:

‘Cause fun socks are for the guys too.
Football
For Dad
Punch up a navy suit or wear them with a hoodie, jeans and chucks.
When his sense of sarcasm is fully developed.

My personal favs…to go with this shirt.
For the guy who likes to make the most of each day (These shirts are super soft)
Although not every day is a gift.
When he really loves his job.


My Grandpa would have loved this one; one of his favorite shirts said “So what?” on the front. The back side said “Who cares?”

Grooming Gifts:

Retro Rocket Trimmer – Ya gotta do it anyway, might as well make it fun. Mark’s had this one for several years and it’s still going strong.

Caffeinated Shave Products Fresh smelling and moisturizing. He needs a little more caffeine in his life.

A rock? Sure, if it’s one of these.
Favorite scents: Watermelon Tourmaline, Turquoise, Marble and Malachite
Have this one on hand if he’s on Santa’s naughty list this year.

For the guy who knows his way around in the kitchen:

Mark uses this milk frother every day.

Dishwasher Sign We have and love this. This handy product puts a stop to those scintillating questions like “Do I need to start the dishwasher?” and “Is this ready to unload?” You have more important things to discuss.

Meat Shredders – We use these often.

I think he’d love this oven mitt…or this one.

Pizza Wheel – He can always use another tool.

Speaking of tools, here are a few that are small enough to slip into a stocking.

Drill bits

Sandpaper, Electrical tape, Duck tape, Painter’s tape and super glue are useful gifts for most handymen.

Dude food:

If you have go-to stocking stuffers for men, I’d love to hear about them in the comments. I’m always up for some new ideas. Happy shopping!

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Make a Pumpkin Pie Bunting

How fun is this little bunting?! I decided to write a tutorial so that you can make one (or a million) too!

For each 8 slice bunting, you will need the following materials:

Kunin ‘Pumpkin Spice’ felt sheets – 1 sheet per bunting, bought at Joann Fabrics
Kunin ‘Cashmere Tan’ felt sheets – 2 sheets per bunting, bought at Joann Fabrics
Clear Tacky Glue
Hot Glue – I use mini glue guns for small projects like this one.
Scissors – I use mine for fabric only. They stay sharp for years this way.
Twine – Raid the garage, any twine will do. Cut to 8′ length.
1″ White Pom Poms – You’ll need one for each slice of pie. I used store bought; but tiny, hand made poms would be darling.

To make the pie slice template: Cut a piece of chipboard or heavy cardstock into a 3″ x 4″ rectangle. Find and mark the center of one 3″ end.

Draw lines from the opposite corners to create the triangle, as shown.

Curve the crust end of the template just slightly; use a small saucer as a guide, if you like.

Using your fancy-schmancy template, cut eight slices each of cashmere tan and pumpkin spice. Glue each slice of pumpkin spice onto a slice of cashmere tan, using clear tacky glue. (The glue is important. I tried white tacky glue and it seeped through the felt and was visible when dried. #craftfail #tragic)

We’ll trim the sides of the slices later, so avoid gluing all the way to the edge. (Dried glue is difficult to cut through and shows between the layers of felt.) Dot the center of each slice with glue so the weight of the pom pom doesn’t pull it loose.

Don’t worry about lining the edges up perfectly. Set the slices aside to dry.

For the pie crust: Starting on the long side of the felt sheet in cashmere tan, cut strips in gentle waves slightly narrower than .5″ wide. Repeat until you have six strips total.

Lay the strips out, and then flip every other strip over so the waves are opposite one another as shown below.

Overlap the ends of each set of two strips. Using hot glue, dot the ends and press together in a narrow “v” shape.

Once the glue has set, start to lay the strips over each other without twisting them. As you work, dot the underside between the strips with hot glue. I glued every second overlap. Be sure to burn off your fingerprints with the hot glue. I don’t think you can call yourself a crafter if you don’t. (Of course, I’m kidding. Please take care when crafting dangerously.)

Continue overlapping and dotting the underside with glue until you reach the end of the strips, then glue the end closed. The strips should lay fairly flat. You’ll need three complete strips for the eight slice bunting.

Use the template to trim the sides of the now dried, pie slices.

Find the center of the length of twine and place it between two pie slices spaced 1.5″ from each other. Using hot glue, quickly glue the twine down. Spacing evenly, work outward from the center, adding three more slices on each side.

Next, glue sections of pie crust trim to the top of each pie slice. Leave a little excess overhanging the edges.

Turn the bunting over and cut off the excess crust. Take care not to cut the twine accidentally! If the cut ends of the trim are loose, dot hot glue on to secure.

Hot glue a white pom pom to the center of each slice for the dollop of cream, then hang your bunting! Mine is just wide enough to span the front of the Hoosier cabinet.

See that cute little tractor? I’m gossiping about it on Instagram today. Join me!

Whether you are travelling for the holiday or staying hygged up at home, I hope your Thanksgiving celebration is a happy one.

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Let’s Have a Crafternoon – Painted Acorns

Here’s a quick and thrifty idea for fall decor. Paint acorns in every shade of the rainbow, (well, except for purple, apparently) and pearlize them. This is a simple and fun craft to make with kids.

Don’t you think these look like tiny candies?

Here’s how I made them:

Collect fallen acorns.

Rinse the acorns thoroughly, and allow them to dry completely.

(Bonus step: Bake the acorns in the oven at the lowest temperature for an hour or so, to kill any unwanted inhabitants. I didn’t do this, but I should have. I left mine in a bucket in the garage for two weeks or so. Apparently the little freeloaders can live for two weeks in there. Notice a worm. Scream like a girl, etc.)

Glue loose acorns back into their caps using clear tacky glue.

Carefully paint the acorn using acrylic craft paint and flat and detail paint brushes. Let the first coat dry, then apply a second coat if necessary to get the desired coverage. One the acrylic paint has dried, apply a pearlizing medium over the acorn. This will soften the tone of the first coat considerably. Let dry, and display as you please.

Crank some tunes, make a mess! Sip a big ol’ mug of tea while you’re working.

Here are some ideas for variations:

  • Go monochromatic, and paint the entire acorn in a single color.
  • Create an ombre display using progressively darker tones of the same color.
  • Mix pearlizing medium directly into the acrylic paint if you like.
  • Dry-brush the cap using white paint for a weathered effect.
  • Paint glue onto the cap and sprinkle glitter over the wet glue.

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Packing a Shoe Box for Operation Christmas Child – What Fits Inside the Box?

Since the gift idea blog post, I’ve had some requests to show how those items fit inside the shoe box. While I can’t send every toy to each child, I squeeze as much as possible into each box, making use of every nook and cranny. It’s most important to send a fun “wow” item and school supplies, clothing and extra toys are secondary.

I ordered plastic shoe boxes from Samaritan’s Purse for a few reasons: They’re large (6 quart), sturdy and reusable. The children can use them to store their things long-term. Parents often use them for food storage in the home, to keep foods dry and pests out, or to hold washing water.

Here are some things I learned while packing the boxes:

Roll the clothes. I tried several different packing tricks but rolling made them the most compact. The boy’s socks are thick with larger cuffs, so I rolled each pair separately. When rolling socks, stagger them so that the cuffs aren’t lined up. The girl’s socks are thinner, so I rolled two pairs together.

Underwear: Folding and rubber banding the underwear together spares the recipient the potential embarrassment of opening underwear in front of their friends. That’s never gonna be a fun party game! I folded them so that the elastic waistband shows, and they’ll get an idea of what it is without removing the rubber bands.

Boys underwear: While I don’t regret buying the five pack of boxer briefs for $2, I’ll stick to only buying briefs in the future. They take up a lot less room than boxers.

This next point blew me away! It’s so important to remove the packaging. I decided to collect all of the paper and plastic trash in one bag, and see how much our boxes generated. WOW! Enough to overflow a laundry basket. When you think of sending all of this trash overseas, the decision to remove the packaging becomes very obvious.

I used my car packing method to pack the boxes in layers. Here’s what fit into the girl’s boxes.

Layer One: tiara headband

Layer Two: 20″ beach ball

Layer Three: pencil pouch with school supplies, comb, leggings, three pairs of underwear, pencil sharpener

Because we want to send as many gifts as possible, the pencil sharpener has three pencil cap erasers stuffed inside, along with two stretch headbands.

The pencil pouch contains: 6 pencils, 10 markers, 10 colored pencils, 1 highlighter, 2 large erasers and 1 pair of scissors

Layer Four: toothbrush, tee shirt, bag of jacks, toy turtle, toy fish, bar of soap, box of 24 crayons, smooshed Minnie, 2 glue sticks, 2 pairs of socks

Layer Five: washcloth

Layer Six: composition notebook

The lid snaps on flat (mostly!) and because the box is filled to the gills, I placed rubber bands around it. Godspeed to the fantastic volunteers in the processing center who have to unpack and re-pack these boxes to go through customs!

So, that’s what fits! I hope this post was helpful to you. If you have ideas to share about how to pack shoeboxes, please let me know in the comments. Click to learn more about Operation Christmas Child.

This post is not sponsored. I only endorse charities that I personally support, and I hope you will consider supporting them too!

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Make an Easy Beaded Bracelet

Each year at the beach, the whole crew goes souvenir shopping at Callahan’s of Calabash. It’s tradition. We load up on tees, hoodies, ball caps, beach totes and usually buy a blown glass Christmas ornament or two. We try to find an ornament that commemorates a special occasion, accomplishment or event during the year. For the past several years, my cousin Ruby and I have selected a piece of costume jewelry so that we can ‘twin’ across-the-miles when vacation is over.

This beaded bracelet with wooden buckle clasp was our pick a few years ago. Over time the elastic has become slack on a few of the strands, so it’s time for a restring. While I’m repairing mine, I thought it would be fun to show you how to make these easy bracelets. This project is simple enough that older kids can make them, with a little adult assistance in tying the knots.

Here are the materials you’ll need:
Buckle Clasp
Beads
Jelly Cord – I’m using 1mm
E-6000 – optional, to secure knots
Scissors
Ruler
Toothpick, or other small implement for applying glue – if using E-6000
Beading tray or kitchen towel – I don’t have a beading tray, so I use a terry cloth kitchen towel to stop beads from rolling off my work surface.

Now it’s time for math class! To calculate the length of beads needed: Using your favorite bracelet length, subtract the length of the buckle clasp when closed and multiply the result by the number of strands in the bracelet. (If you are using very chunky beads, make your bracelet a little longer than normal because of the larger bracelet circumference. The cord will sit farther away from your wrist. Does that make sense?!)

I like a 7.5″ bracelet. The buckle clasp is 1.5″ long when closed, so my strands of beads would be 6″ long. I have 5 holes in the clasp, and 6 x 5 = 30, so I need 30″ of beads. I bought a little extra in case there are any wonky beads. Make sure the bead strands will be narrow enough to fit into your clasp without crowding – I’m using 6mm beads, but I could have gone a little wider. Okay, class dismissed. Now it’s time for the fun stuff!

Taking your bead length measurement from above, cut a generous length of jelly cord. Keep in mind that you will need extra cord to feed through the clasp ends and for knot tying. I cut mine at about 40″.

Slip one end of the jelly cord through an end hole in one of the clasp pieces. Tie a large knot in the jelly cord, and pull it tight. Tug on it to make sure that the knot will not pull through the hole in the clasp. String the first row of beads, measure for length, then weave the jelly cord through the other clasp piece.

Repeat the process for each row. Before tying the final knot, lay the bracelet flat and make sure that the rows are uniform in length, and the cord is pulled firmly through, but not stretched. I used the toothpick end to tighten the jelly cord loops, row by row. Tie a large knot at the end. Trim the excess cord off of each end, and place a dab of E-6000 on each knot to help secure it. Your bracelet is complete!

To shop the post: Jelly cord / E-6000 / Buckle clasp / Beads

Love the beads, but not up for a crafternoon? I got you.
Multicolor / Turquoise / Lavender Multi / Red

Do these beads look like Sixlets to you, too? Don’t you think this is the adult version of wearing a candy necklace? This bracelet is a fun way to perk up weekend denim or a plain jersey and would make cute, girlfriend gifts. Happy Crafting!

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Packing a Shoe Box for Operation Christmas Child

Y’all, this is so fun! Operation Christmas Child shares the joy and promise of Christmas with children around the world, by distributing shoe boxes filled to the brim with gifts. For many of these children living in poverty, this is the first gift they receive. Some of these deliveries are made on camel back, loaded onto elephants, others strapped to motorcycles; but all are delivered with love.

In 2018, more than 10.6 million shoe boxes were collected for distribution to 112 countries and territories. That’s a whole lot of joy!

Boxes carried by oxen in Mongolia. (Oxen with boxen?! Ha ha!) Photo Credit: Samaritan’s Purse

With just twelve weeks to go until national collection week, here are some fun ideas for shoe box packing:

One Wow Item: Dolls, stuffed animals and deflated soccer balls (with a pump) are all great. Mickey and Minnie are our “wow” items this year; boys get Mickey, and girls get Minnie. We folded them over, and placed rubber bands around them to make them as small as possible. The indignity! I tried using hair ties, but the fabric is too slick and they slid right off. Oh, well. The kids can have a humdinger of a rubber band fight!

Other Fun Stuff: Marbles, jacks, jump ropes, Matchbox cars, beach balls, sticky catch games, water bottles, playing cards, stickers, coloring books, journals and Lego kits are all fun additions to shoe box gifts. See Shanika and Sherika’s story below to learn why they were thrilled to get a set of jacks in their shoe boxes.

School supplies: In many areas around the world, school supplies are the ticket to education. Can you imagine not attending school simply because you don’t have paper or a pencil? One lady on a distribution trip reported that teachers break pencils into several pieces, so that more students can have one.

Something to Wear: Walmart and Kohls had great end-of-summer sales on kid’s clothing. The boys get tees and shorts, and I found tees, capri pants and dresses for the girls. Shoes and flip-flops are useful and appreciated.

I sure hope that the boy who receives this outfit is a little spitfire. He’ll need a lot of personality to rock that monster tee!

We’ll KonMari the heck out of the clothing, and keep them folded during processing and shipment using rubber bands.

Personal Care Items: We’re packing for elementary age children this year, so a comb, washcloth, toothbrush with cover and a bar of soap will do the job. Just picture twelve children sharing a washcloth, or 25 children sharing a toothbrush. Such simple items can mean the world to a child in need.

Tuck a Christmas card, your picture and a note of encouragement into your shoe box. Let the child know that you love them, and are praying for them. Include your address if you like; sometimes the recipient or their parents will write to you!

Here are some helpful tips I’ve learned from the Shoebox Shoppers Facebook group:

  • You do not have to use OCC boxes, although they’re nice! Any shoe box will do. Standard sizes are best because they can pack more into a carton when they are a uniform size. However, odd/larger size boxes will not be rejected.
  • Remove all packaging material from the shoe box items. Most of the receiving countries do not have the resources to handle trash. The recipient will not think that your gift is used if it’s not in the manufacturer’s packaging.
  • Fill the box to the brim. Don’t ship air!
  • Boxes are inspected at 8 different processing centers around the U.S. The volunteers view each box as your unique gift to a child, and do not remove items unless they’re on the prohibited list. (Liquid, glass, seeds, war-related, etc.) They do not re-distribute gifts from one box to another. They will add to a box if needed, and keep small filler items on hand in case a box has extra room.
  • Track your box online, but know that some boxes go to sensitive countries and you might not learn the final destination of your gift. Be sure to include $9 per box to cover the costs of shipping and transportation.

No time to pack a shoebox? You can quickly build one online here:
https://www.samaritanspurse.org/operation-christmas-child/buildonline/

Here are some stories from shoe box recipients.
Izabella’s Story:
https://www.samaritanspurse.org/operation-christmas-child/shoebox-stories-izabella-and-a-snow-globe/
Shanika and Sherika’s Story:
https://www.samaritanspurse.org/operation-christmas-child/shoeboxstories-shanika-sherika-and-the-notebooks/
TRIGGER WARNING (Abuse/Sexual Assault) Boun’s story is difficult to hear, but so important:
https://video.samaritanspurse.org/boun-thornes-story-gifts-from-god/?fbclid=IwAR1-6fwko-4FOINBMsc4C94PRSIXCwngixknbyDvYAk9n6YvJxN_O_hl9PU

What a beautiful and simple way to bring the good news of Jesus to children around the world!

Helicopter delivery in Honduras. Photo credit: Samaritan’s Purse

This post is not sponsored. I only endorse charities that I personally support, and I hope you will consider supporting them too!

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Antiquing Technique for Painted Wood

There are a couple of go-to techniques that I use when antiquing a painted wooden item. One of them is the wax resist technique that I used on the race medal holder. Today, I’ll share how to antique a piece using stamping ink.

Materials:
Painted wooden item
Sandpaper
Chocolate brown ink pad – water based, not pigment
Small paint brush – use an old one
Rag – for wiping excess ink off the piece
Spray sealer – optional

It’s important to use water based stamping ink. Because pigment ink is so thick, it will smear over the surface of your project, not soak into the wood.

When distressing a painted piece, focus on the areas that would be naturally worn through use. I’m distressing a child’s canoe paddle, so I’ll sand the handle and sides, where the paddle might bump into the canoe. Sand down to the raw wood.

Because you’ll be rubbing the ink into the wood, use a paint brush that you’re okay with ruining. Kid’s craft brushes are perfect for this project. I’m using a foam brush. Dab the brush onto the stamp pad and then onto your project. Make sure to cover the exposed wood completely. Keep a rag handy so that you can wipe excess ink off as you work.

Once you’ve antiqued the raw wood, use the brush to lightly sweep a little ink onto a few of the painted sections of your project. Rather than leaving the painted areas pristine, this gives the piece an overall look of age. I inked a few places on the word “cabins”.

If your project will be handled during use, seal it to protect the finish. I like spray matte sealer.

This antiquing technique can also be used to age paper crafts. For that application, I would use a kid’s craft brush and gently dab the ink on until the desired coverage is reached. I’ve seen this used in dollhouse miniatures to give a time-worn look.

I hope you’ll give this technique a try on your projects!

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Nautical Gift Wrap

Here’s a quick and inexpensive way to add some interest to gift packages. Tie varied knots using lightweight rope instead of ribbon. In addition to being unusual, these embellishments are practical because they will not flatten during transport.

You will need:
Nautical theme gift wrap (Maritime designs, maps, paper in beachy, bright colors would work as well)
Gift Wrapping Tape
Scissors
Nylon clothesline or other rope – $2
Spring Link – optional – I call them caribiners – $2
Lighter – optional
Large letter stickers and tags – optional

Unless you’re a knot-tying expert, (I’m knot! Get it? Heh.) watch the videos that I’ve linked below. You can play the video and pause when you needed, or click the right or left arrows to see one step at a time.

Bowline Knot – After I formed the first loop, I hooked the caribiner through the tail end of the rope.
https://www.animatedknots.com/bowline-knot

I struggled with this knot until I realized that the loop looked like a lowercase “g”. Do you see it?

After I tied the bowline knot on one end of the caribiner, I wrapped the rope snugly around the package a few times. Then I tied another bowline knot at the other end of the caribiner. Push the knot close to the caribiner before tightening, so that the rope stays fairly tight around the package.

Careful adults only step:
I sealed the cut ends of the rope by melting them with a lighter. If you do this, please don’t set yourself (or anything else) on fire, and take care not to breathe fumes from melting plastic. Don’t attempt to seal the ends of cotton rope. We call those ‘candle wicks’.

Single Rope Braid – I didn’t know that you could form a braid like this with a single piece of rope. This braid is simple, so I added a paper tag with the recipient’s initial.
https://www.animatedknots.com/single-rope-braid-knot

Carrick Bend Knot – Because I wanted the knot to lay flat, I doubled up the rope and did not tighten the knot down in the final step.
https://www.animatedknots.com/carrick-bend-knot

Use a square knot to tie the loose ends together on the underside of the package.
https://www.animatedknots.com/square-knot

And there you have it! Simple nautical (knot-ical?) gift packages. I hope you will try this out. If you do, I’d love to hear from you in the comments or via email: arthurized dot home at gmail dot com

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Let’s Make Fire Starters

Years ago, we took two of our nephews and a niece on a white-water rafting trip in West Virginia. We tent camped that weekend and planned to roast our dinner (and s’mores) over a campfire. My niece and I got to work starting the fire. We had nice, dry firewood, sturdy matches and kindling gathered from the surrounding area.

There were thunderstorms that day and the humidity was nearly 100%. We couldn’t get our kindling to ignite, so we started looking for paper to burn. Having none, we did what all intrepid explorers do and burned our atlas! (This was in the days before GPS, when dinosaurs roamed the Earth.) Fortunately, that worked. We had a nice cookout that night and were able to find our way home at the end of the trip.

Shortly after that, my sister gave us these awesome egg carton fire starters and we’ve been using them ever since. The combination of wax and paper helps them to burn for several minutes; long enough to ignite a nice fire.

Disclaimer: I should warn you up front that this project is for careful adults only. Always use caution when working with fire, flammable materials and heat sources. I don’t want you to singe those beautiful eyebrows off. Or worse.

That said, and because I love an element of danger, let’s dive right in!

Here’s what you’ll need to make the fire starters:

  • Paper egg cartons with lids removed – do not use foam!
  • Wax from discarded candles
  • Flammable Filler, small pine cones, tree bark, sawdust, etc. The lid of the paper egg carton torn into small pieces will work.
  • Scented/Decorative Filler, dried citrus peel, cinnamon stick pieces, etc. – this is entirely optional
  • Double boiler for melting wax – Mine came from the flea market for $1. You can often find vintage, aluminum double boilers inexpensively at yard sales and thrift stores. I do not use this one for food.
  • Metal ladle – optional, but useful if you’re like me; not very accurate when pouring liquids.
  • Sturdy scissors – I used herb scissors.
  • Cardboard, plastic and newspaper or paper grocery bags for protecting your work surface.

This is a great way to recycle/upcycle both the egg cartons and discarded candles.

Cover your work surface with cardboard or plastic with layers of paper on top. The melted wax makes this a messy project! Children could help with gathering the supplies and arranging them in the egg cartons, but the wax melting and pouring is an adults only step in the process. You may just want to send them to Grandma’s (or at least out of the room) while you’re working with hot wax.

Remove the lids from the egg cartons, Set the lids aside for another use or tear them into small pieces to use as filler. Using scissors, cut in between the cups without cutting them completely apart, like the photos below. This will make it easier to break them into individual fire starters.

Fill the cups of the egg carton with your choice of flammables. If you are using scented/decorative filler, arrange that on top of any less attractive filler. I layered mine with torn egg carton lids, dried orange peel, hemlock cones and birch bark.

Gluten for you, gluten-free for me! Kidding. Don’t eat these.

Over low heat, melt the wax in a double boiler. Watch the wax as it melts. Do not leave it unattended and certainly don’t let it come to a boil. Also, don’t bother cleaning your stove until after this messy project!

Once the wax has just melted, remove it from the heat and carefully pour or ladle it into the prepared egg cups. Fill just the whole cup section. You can carefully press the filler materials down into the wax if needed.

I wish that you could smell these fire starters. I made two batches, one is from a vanilla bean scented soy candle and the other is cinnamon scented. Both batches smell amazing!

Let the wax harden completely, and then pull the cups apart. You’ll appreciate that you cut the cups before filling them. I forgot one time, and spent the next few evenings hacking at them with a utility knife. #blisters

To burn, just light a corner of the fire starter.

These fire starters make great gifts (hint: Christmas) for the outdoorsy people in your life. Or anyone who enjoys a fire pit, chiminea or wood burning fireplace. Fill a pretty basket or bowl with fire starters and a nice box of matches or a butane lighter. If your friends love a fire in the fire pit, give a pretty bag of these fire starters along with a cozy throw for chilly evenings.

Fill a cellophane bag with fire starters and place into a large gift bag with s’mores fixins’: a bag of marshmallows, a box of graham crackers and some Hershey’s chocolate bars. Go crazy, and add some Reese’s peanut butter cups to the kit. (Don’t grill foods directly over the fire starters, wait until you’ve got a roaring campfire.)

Throw a few of these into your pack when you go hiking or on a camping trip. As Pa Kettle says, “you just don’t never know” when you’ll need to start a fire.


I hope you will give this project a try. If you do, I’d love to hear from you! Comment here or email me at arthurized dot home at gmail dot com.

I’m not in partnership with any brands referenced in this post. I’m simply sharing products that I use and enjoy, and I hope you will like them too!

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Race Tee Shirt Scarf

If you’ve ever done a 5k (or twenty), you know that race organizers love to throw shirts at their participants. Most of the time you’ll get a technical shirt that is perfect for wearing during your next training walk or run. But sometimes you’ll get a cotton shirt in your swag bag.

Now, don’t get me wrong, cotton tees are great for casual weekend wear, bumming around the house or even wearing as a night shirt. But, cotton is no bueno for sports. It grabs sweat and holds it in the weave of the fabric, which can cause chafing, which can cause pain and well, you know, use of bowling words. No one wants that.

There are plenty of options for unused shirts. They can certainly be donated to charity, passed along to family or friends who will wear them, or upcycled into a myriad of other useful items. Just ask Pinterest.

Speaking of Pinterest, this project was one of my first “pins”. For the past few years I’ve been collecting cotton race/volunteer shirts and setting them aside. You could use favorite shirts you just can’t part with, clothing your kids have outgrown, tee-shirts from sports teams, schools and concerts, or simply a collection of thrifted shirts with attractive graphics. Make sure the shirts are in good condition without holes or stains.

Because I wanted to capture a few larger graphics, I cut my rectangles slightly larger than the tutorial. Mine are 9.5″ by 4.5″, and I cut 21 of them for the front of the scarf. Most of the blocks were cut along the weave of the fabric, but some of them I cut on an angle as below.

I lined them up and rearranged them until I was happy with the layout. If you are working with blocks of text or titles, reverse directions of the layout at the center, otherwise one half will read upside down while the scarf is worn.

Early morning and late night crafting is not conducive to good photography.

Cut the pieces for the back from the remainder of the tee shirts. Cut one more rectangle for the back than you cut for the front, because the blocks will be offset to reduce bulk at the seams.

Sew the front pieces into a long strip, and then do the same to the back pieces. I used lime green thread because with so many colors going on, it didn’t really matter what color I used. Might as well pick something fun! Plus it was already in the machine and I didn’t want to make a bobbin. #lazysewist

Iron the seams flat and trim off any excess fabric from the seams. Pin the front and back together, with right sides facing each other. Make sure the seams lay flat on both sides of the scarf as you pin. When you stitch the edge of the scarf, leave a large enough opening for turning it right side out. Trim off excess fabric from the edges.

Once you’ve turned the scarf right side out, iron it flat. Stitch the opening closed using either a machine top stitch or by hand using an invisible stitch.

Now it’s time for the good stuff…styling your new scarf! Have fun with it!

Invisible Stitch Tutorial:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbE5hXt27uU
Tee Shirt Scarf Tutorial:
http://justsomethingimade.com/2011/02/t-shirt-scarves-the-art-of-repurposing/

I think the back of my scarf resembles a vintage, TV test pattern!

If you make this project, I’d love to see it!
Email me at: arthurized dot home at gmail dot com

Disclosure: In addition to occasional sponsored posts, Arthurized Home uses clickable affiliate links. That means that I may receive a small commission from sales at no extra charge to you. As always, my opinion is 100% my own, and I only recommend things that I truly love or use myself. Thank you for patronizing the brands that support Arthurized Home!

Copyright 2019-2020 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.