Category: Cottage

Decorating the Hoosier for Summer

Even though it’s still spring, it will feel like summer this weekend with highs in the upper 80’s. I’m so excited because I love all things summer: long days, wearing flip-flops, garden produce, campfires and going to the beach!

I’m getting a jump on summer decor, starting with the Hoosier cabinet. Having red, white and blue as my color scheme, I’ll leave this up from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

Of course, the star represents the Star City; and the thermoses are vintage, picnic fun!

Some of these pieces are a nod to my Minnesota childhood. The birch bark canoe is a reminder of summers spent paddling on the lake. The dala horses and the Lisa Larson figurine were gifts to our family from a Swedish exchange student.

I’ve had these metal sand pails for years now. My mother-in-law loved Mary Engelbreit and beach vacations, so these bring back memories of her.

This little guy was part of a Children of the World project that Larson produced for UNICEF. I love his sweet face and little “innie” belly button! He has the cutest bubble butt too, but I’ll try not to embarrass him here.

I’ve collected vintage linens for quite some time. Many of these are gifts from my sister-in-law who started my collection almost 25 years ago.

A little life advice from the Father of His Country. I found this little goodie at a thrift store; and I love the script calligraphy.

The Lone Star State tablecloth was a gift from my Grandpa to his mother when he was working in Texas.

Do you see the navy saucer peeking out from the red bowl? It belonged to my Hoosier Grandma. The California cloth is in memory of my Grandparents; and with love to all my family in the Golden State. The tablecloth is a new piece made to look like vintage, state map hankies.

I’m enjoying the irony of featuring beautiful, English dishes in my celebration of independence from British rule. Which reminds me of the time when my husband wore his Union Jack hoodie to watch the fireworks on July 4th!

The Fiestaware here is a mixture of old and new pieces. The large, navy bowl was my Grandma’s as well; she used her Fiesta everyday.

I usually keep the Hoosier doors open, but here you can see the design on them. I think the hinges and latch are so cool. She’s pretty even when closed!

This cabinet is chock full of sentimental pieces that to an outsider might look a bit like a yard sale! Nearly everything else is gifted, thrifted or from the flea market.

I hope this inspires you to use your well-loved pieces in new and unusual combinations! If you need a few tips for displaying your collectibles, see my Spring Hoosier post.

Bring on summer! I’m ready!

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

How I Repaired Wood Rot and Saved Over $1,000

Arthurized Home has french doors that developed some wood rot along the threshold. The folks at a big box home improvement center told us it couldn’t be repaired and that we should replace the entire door unit; to the tune of well over $1,000.

My sister had just successfully repaired a wooden column on her front porch using Abatron’s LiquidWood and WoodEpox, so we decided to give it a try. We ordered a kit from Amazon that was about $40.

The first step is to scrape away all of the rotten wood. Really dig in there and make sure you get it all. Remove anything that comes off easily. We were horrified to see the true extent of the damage, especially on that center support.

Tape off the area where you will be working in case there are epoxy drips. Use plastic sheeting if necessary. This product is meant to last, and drips or spills will not clean off easily.

The next step is to stabilize the adjoining area using LiquidWood. It’s an epoxy mixture that soaks into the wood and hardens it, preventing it from future rot. I probably went a little overboard drilling holes here, but I wanted to be extra thorough. I drilled slightly downward so the epoxy would flow down into the holes, not right back out of them. Mix the LiquidWood according to the package directions and paint onto your project, completely covering any exposed wood.

Let the epoxy dry completely.

Now comes the fun part! Mix the two-part WoodEpox together according to the package directions. It’s like playing with putty! Make sure the colors blend completely to solid white. That’s how you’ll know it is thoroughly mixed. Work quickly and in small batches; this starts to set up shortly after mixing.

Smoosh (yes, that’s the technical term! Smoosh!) it into and onto the areas you’re repairing. This product sands easily, so don’t be shy about piling on the WoodEpox. Apply enough product so that when you sand, you don’t end up with dimples or valleys.

Let that dry completely and start sanding. I used a triangular detail sander to get into those corners.

Yep, I realize there is a spider on the trim. This is country living; and I don’t mind them as long as they stay outside of the house.

So much better!

Once the repair is complete you can paint the WoodEpox. This repair is almost four years old now, and still looks (and functions) as good as new.

For more information on the products that I used to repair my door frame:
https://www.abatron.com/product/wood-restoration-kit/

This post is not sponsored; I’m simply sharing my honest experience with this product.

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Tips for Displaying Your Collectibles – Decorating the Hoosier for Spring

This Hoosier cabinet is a kitchen workhorse. It’s been a pantry, storage for extra dishes and large pots but most often it has been a display area for seasonal decorations and collectibles.

Several of the items in here have sentimental value; a memory tied to an experience, found or given to us by family, starting with the Hoosier itself. A gift from my sister.

This bird nest was part of the decor at my Indiana grandma’s 90th birthday party. The china belonged to my grandma in California and was lovingly shipped here by my aunt and uncle. Other items were collected over time from the flea market, thrift stores and yard sales. Some pieces are new, purchased at a discount.

The bunnies are new pieces, the leaf plates are a gift from my mom. The vintage table linens below were collected over time, mostly gifts from my sister-in-law.

“Chocolate” bunny found at TJ Maxx.

This apron was sewn by another sister. She chose cherry fabric for me because at the time we had nine cherry trees on our property.

The Fiestaware is a reminder of my Indiana Grandma and her colorful kitchen. She used Fiesta as her everyday dishes and had a glass front cabinet in her kitchen chock full of it.

These chick vases were found on a shopping trip to Dixie Pottery in Abingdon, VA with my mother-in-law and sisters-in-law. They are new pieces with a vintage look.

This cookbook holder with illustrations cracks me up! If you need an infographic for how to hold a cookbook open; perhaps the cooking is best left to someone else?

My husband bought this little teacup for me. It’s hard to read the message, but it says “Be always happy”. I imagine the original owner drank her tea from it and her thumb resting on the cup wore off the word “always”.

The lemonade pitcher and glasses were a birthday gift from my sister-in-law.

Here are some tips for displaying your collectibles:

  • Decide on a color scheme/theme. In this case, I’ve used all pastel and Spring/Easter items. You could go with brights, all white, monochromatic, etc.
  • Group like items together. Odd numbered groupings look best.
  • Vary the height of the pieces on each shelf. Try to arrange vignettes of triangles and inverted triangles. This creates movement and helps to guide the eye through your display.
  • When decorating shelves or bookcases, group colors and stagger them from right to left in a vertical zig-zag pattern.
  • Most importantly, use what you love! From the outside looking in, this may seem like a strange group of unrelated pieces, but nearly every item reminds me of an experience or someone I love. And that is the real story of my home and yours.

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Cottage Style Race Medal Display – A Tutorial

One of my goals for the year is to find a way to display the race medals that my husband and I have accumulated. We’ve got them stuffed into storage boxes in closets and the basement. I’ve been shopping for a large medal holder and just haven’t found the perfect thing. So I decided to make one from a wooden shutter.

Adapt this project for your own use! Make sure the louvers are fixed and strong enough to support whatever you hang from them. You could use a sturdy shutter and hooks to hang kitchen utensils, towels and aprons. If you have a young girl in your life, make a display for hair clips, bows and jewelry, etc. Create one for your garage or potting shed to hang work gloves and hand tools. The possibilities are endless!

Materials List:
A note about the paint: Eggshell or matte acrylic is best. I used leftover “oops” paint for this project and found that the semi-gloss topcoat peeled a little more than I liked during sanding. Choose a color for the undercoat that contrasts nicely with the topcoat.

  • Shutter
  • Paint for undercoat
  • Wax candle in white or ivory
  • Paint for topcoat
  • Old paint brush
  • Sandpaper
  • Cleat for hanging, rated for the weight of your project – I bought mine at Lowe’s
  • Optional – decorative trim of your choosing
  • Optional – spray matte sealer to protect the painted finish

I found this shutter at the Habitat ReStore and it is in great condition;
22″ wide by 66″ tall made from solid wood with wide louvers.
Weighing about 20 pounds, it’s not too heavy to hang on the wall.

The shutter had some brown stains on it that I initially thought were water damage, but it was just sawdust(?) and rinsed right off. I didn’t bother to sand it. I’m going for a rough/chippy/distressed look. A few lumps and bumps contribute to that.

The first step is to add paint in a color that contrasts with the top coat. I chose a chocolate brown paint, because I want the impression that the shutter is old and made from a dark wood. Apply the undercoat to corners, decorative trim and edges where time and use would have worn the paint away.

Next rub a wax candle on areas where you want the top coat to sand off easily. The wax will resist the paint. It’s important to use a white or light colored candle, otherwise you might stain the undercoat.

My sister gave me some enameled ‘his’ and ‘hers’ plates that are perfect for this project. Thanks, Allie!

Apply the wax heavily and don’t worry about removing the excess. Remember, we’re going for an aged/chippy/distressed look.

Now, it’s time for the top coat. If you have one, use an old project paint brush because jamming it down between the louvers will ruin the bristles. I tried using a foam brush and it didn’t hold up well.


Touch up any bare spots if needed and let the paint dry completely. Now, it’s time for the magic! If you’re like me and have forgotten where you waxed, start lightly sanding the piece and the paint will easily release in the waxed areas. Affix any decorative pieces and attach the hanging cleat to the back of the shutter and to the wall.

I bought the 200 lb. hanging cleat; you could certainly go lighter. This one has a level that slides into the cleat. We did not drill into studs to install, but the shutter is very secure.

The total cost of this project was $41. I paid $25 for the shutter, $15 for the hanging cleat and used about $1 of Oops paint.

Don’t mind my internet cable; I’ll place a basket there to hide it!

If you make this project, I would love to see it! Send me an email at arthurized dot home at gmail dot com.

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.

Style Your Books for St. Paddy’s

March means rainbows and shamrocks at Arthurized Home and while we don’t go all out with an Irish theme, we add a few touches here and there. Here are some ways to bring the St. Paddy’s love with your books.

Rainbows: Gather up books with attractive spines and arrange them in rainbow order. The subjects don’t matter, you’re just looking for bright, eye-catching color.

Neutral with a touch of green: Maybe bright colors are not your thing. Grab a stack of books with a neutral look, stack them and add a nod to the holiday. I found these tea cups years ago at a thrift shop. If you don’t have something similar, you could use a green tea cup or a small, potted shamrock. Shamrocks (oxalis) are cheap as chips in the grocery stores right now. Maybe tie a pale green ribbon around the books, or place a small bowl of gold foil-wrapped chocolates on top?

All green: This couldn’t be more simple. Stack books with green spines in an ombre gradient. Add a decorative item on top. Try a small gold candle, an air plant or a bowl of brightly colored candies.

This decor idea can be used with any holiday, red and green books at Christmas, Fall colors for September through November, etc. Have fun playing with it!

Copyright 2019 © Arthurized Home – All Rights Reserved. This post is the original content of Arthurized Home. If you’re reading this on another site, it’s unArthurized.